Restraining Orders

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Restraining Orders?

Our attorneys are ready to help with your restraining orders case.

What is an Oregon restraining order?

Oregon’s laws for allowing restraining orders under the Family Abuse Protection Act (FAPA) provides a means for courts to address abuse within the family quickly. At its core, a restraining order is a legal document called an "Order" by a judge, which requires that one party stay away from one or more people who are alleged or shown to have been abused. To get a restraining order from the court, a person must provide evidence that shows that they have been "abused" within the past 180 days. Oregon law defines "abuse" as: 1. Attempting to cause or intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing bodily injury. 2. Intentionally, knowingly or recklessly placing another in fear of imminent bodily injury. 3. Causing another to engage in involuntary sexual relations by force or threat of force.

An Oregon restraining order must be between people who are family or close to each other.

Oregon law prescribes who can get a FAPA restraining order. Unlike other types of protective orders, there are specific requirements. The abuser must: 1. Be a spouse or former spouse; 2. An adult person related by blood, marriage or adoption; 3. A person who has lived in the same household; or 4. Someone with whom the abused person has been involved in a sexually intimate relationship within two years of filing for the restraining order.

When should I get an Oregon restraining order?

Restraining orders are an important tool to prevent continuing abuse. However, sometimes they are misused to gain the upper hand in a divorce or other family law matters. Oregon's restraining orders can have prolonged consequences and should only be used when they are legitimately to prevent abuse. Careful consideration of the results to involved parties must be taken into account, particularly if the party alleging the abuse finds themselves struggling to “fit” their circumstances within the legal requirements. Our lawyers are experienced not only in assisting victims of abuse to maintain existing restraining orders, but also in providing a defense and having dismissed orders that were obtained incorrectly.

What can an Oregon restraining order lawyer do for me?

At Pacific Family Law Firm, our attorneys will provide detailed advice about the merits of obtaining a restraining order, and how it may work in conjunction with other pending family law matters. We can assist you in keeping a protective order in place. Alternatively, if you have been served with a restraining order, we can provide a skilled defense to get the order removed. With potential long-term consequences of an Oregon restraining on employment or your legal record, you must discuss the matter with an experienced and skilled Oregon restraining order attorney.

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Restraining Orders
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

How do I obtain an Oregon restraining order?
To obtain a restraining order in Oregon, you must file a petition with the Circuit Court in the county where you live or where the abuse occurred. You'll need to complete the necessary forms, provide detailed information about the abuser and incidents of abuse, and attend a hearing before a judge who will assess your request.
What types of restraining orders are available in Oregon?
In Oregon, there are three main types of restraining orders: Family Abuse Prevention Act (FAPA) orders for domestic violence victims, Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities Abuse Prevention Act (EPPDAPA) orders for vulnerable adults, and Sexual Abuse Protective Orders (SAPO) for survivors of non-intimate partner sexual assault.
How long does an Oregon restraining order last?
Temporary restraining orders typically last until your court hearing date, which is usually within 14 days. If granted by a judge after this hearing, a final restraining order can last up to one year but can be renewed if needed. In some cases involving extreme risk protection orders or stalking protective orders, they may be indefinite.
Can an Oregon restraining order be modified or terminated?
Yes, either party can request modifications or termination of a restraining order by filing appropriate paperwork with the court and attending another hearing before a judge who will consider whether circumstances have changed sufficiently to warrant changes.
What happens if someone violates an Oregon restraining order?
Violating an Oregon restraining order is considered contempt of court and can result in criminal charges such as misdemeanor or felony charges depending on the severity of violation; this may lead to fines or imprisonment.
Does an out-of-state or foreign protective order apply in Oregon?
Yes, under federal law called Full Faith & Credit provision all states must enforce valid out-of-state protective/restraining orders as if they were issued in Oregon. You should register your order with local authorities to ensure proper enforcement.
Can a respondent fight against an Oregon restraining order?
Yes, if you are served with a temporary restraining order, you have the right to request a hearing before a judge within 30 days to contest its issuance. It is strongly recommended that you consult with an attorney experienced in family law and divorce matters for guidance.
How does a restraining order affect child custody and parenting time?
A restraining order can impact child custody and parenting time by limiting the access of the restrained party to the children or by placing restrictions on visitation, such as supervised visits or no contact at all depending on the nature of abuse. Further, there is a statutory consideration against awarding custody to a parent who is determined to have committed abuse.


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Useful Oregon Statutes For
Restraining Orders

Petition To Circuit Court For Relief


(1) Any person who has been the victim of abuse within the preceding 180 days may petition the circuit court for relief under ORS 107.700 (Short title) to 107.735 (Duties of State Court Administrator), if the person is in imminent danger of further abuse from the abuser. The person may seek relief by filing a petition with the circuit court alleging that the person is in imminent danger of abuse from the respondent, that the person has been the victim of abuse committed by the respondent within the 180 days preceding the filing of the petition and particularly describing the nature of the abuse and the dates thereof. The abuse must have occurred not more than 180 days before the filing of the petition. The petition must include allegations made under oath or affirmation or a declaration under penalty of perjury. The circuit court shall have jurisdiction over all proceedings under ORS 107.700 (Short title) to 107.735 (Duties of State Court Administrator).

(2) The petitioner has the burden of proving a claim under ORS 107.700 (Short title) to 107.735 (Duties of State Court Administrator) by a preponderance of the evidence.

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Read Full Text: ORS 107.710

Hearing On Restraining Order


If the respondent requests a hearing pursuant to ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) (10), the court shall hold the hearing within 21 days after the request. However, if the respondent contests the order granting temporary child custody to the petitioner, the court shall hold the hearing within five days after the request.

(2)(a) If the court determines under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) (2) that exceptional circumstances exist that affect the custody of a child, the court shall hold a hearing within 14 days after issuance of the restraining order. The clerk of the court shall provide a notice of the hearing along with the petition and order to the petitioner and, in accordance with ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) (8), to the county sheriff for service on the respondent.

(b) The respondent may request an earlier hearing, to be held within five days after the request. The hearing request form shall be available from the clerk of the court in the form prescribed by the State Court Administrator under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) (7). If the respondent requests an earlier hearing, the clerk of the court shall notify the parties of the scheduled hearing date by mailing a notice of the time and place of hearing to the addresses provided in the petition or, for the respondent, to the address provided in the request for hearing, or as otherwise designated by a party.

(c) When the court schedules a hearing under this subsection, the respondent may not request a hearing under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) (10).

(3) In a hearing held pursuant to subsection (1) or (2) of this section:

(a) The court may continue any order issued under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) if the court finds that:

(A) Abuse has occurred within the period specified in ORS 107.710 (Petition to circuit court for relief) (1);

(B) The petitioner reasonably fears for the petitioner’s physical safety; and

(C) The respondent represents a credible threat to the physical safety of the petitioner or the petitioner’s child.

(b) The court may cancel or change any order issued under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) and may assess against either party a reasonable attorney fee and such costs as may be incurred in the proceeding.

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Read Full Text: ORS 107.716

Restraining Order


(1) When a person files a petition under ORS 107.710 (Petition to circuit court for relief), the circuit court shall hold an ex parte hearing in person or by telephone on the day the petition is filed or on the following judicial day. Upon a showing that the petitioner has been the victim of abuse committed by the respondent within 180 days preceding the filing of the petition, that there is an imminent danger of further abuse to the petitioner and that the respondent represents a credible threat to the physical safety of the petitioner or the petitioner’s child, the court shall, if requested by the petitioner, order:

(a) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, that temporary custody of the children of the parties be awarded to the petitioner or, at the request of the petitioner, to the respondent, subject to reasonable parenting time rights of the noncustodial parent, which the court shall order, unless such parenting time is not in the best interest of the child;

(b) That the respondent be required to move from the petitioner’s residence, if in the sole name of the petitioner or if it is jointly owned or rented by the petitioner and the respondent, or if the parties are married to each other;

(c) That the respondent be restrained from entering, or attempting to enter, a reasonable area surrounding the petitioner’s current or subsequent residence if the respondent is required to move from petitioner’s residence;

(d) That a peace officer accompany the party who is leaving or has left the parties’ residence to remove essential personal effects of the party or the party’s children, or both, including but not limited to clothing, toiletries, diapers, medications, Social Security cards, certified copies of records of live birth, identification and tools of the trade;

(e) That the respondent be restrained from intimidating, molesting, interfering with or menacing the petitioner, or attempting to intimidate, molest, interfere with or menace the petitioner;

(f) That the respondent be restrained from intimidating, molesting, interfering with or menacing any children in the custody of the petitioner, or attempting to intimidate, molest, interfere with or menace any children in the custody of the petitioner;

(g) That the respondent be restrained from entering, or attempting to enter, on any premises and a reasonable area surrounding the premises when it appears to the court that such restraint is necessary to prevent the respondent from intimidating, molesting, interfering with or menacing the petitioner or children whose custody is awarded to the petitioner;

(h) Other relief that the court considers necessary to:

(A) Provide for the safety and welfare of the petitioner and the children in the custody of the petitioner, including but not limited to emergency monetary assistance from the respondent; and

(B) Prevent the neglect and protect the safety of any service or therapy animal or any animal kept for personal protection or companionship, but not an animal kept for any business, commercial, agricultural or economic purpose; or

(i) Except as described in subsection (12) of this section or parenting time ordered under this section, that the respondent have no contact with the petitioner in person, by telephone or by mail.

(2) If the court determines that exceptional circumstances exist that affect the custody of a child, the court shall order the parties to appear and provide additional evidence at a hearing to determine temporary custody and resolve other contested issues. Pending the hearing, the court may make any orders regarding the child’s residence and the parties’ contact with the child that the court finds appropriate to provide for the child’s welfare and the safety of the parties. The court shall set a hearing time and date as provided in ORS 107.716 (Hearing) (2) and issue a notice of the hearing at the same time the court issues the restraining order.

(3) The court’s order under subsection (1) of this section is effective for a period of one year or until the order is withdrawn or amended, or until the order is superseded as provided in ORS 107.722 (Effect of dissolution, annulment or separation judgment or modification order on abuse prevention order), whichever is sooner.

(4) If respondent is restrained from entering, or attempting to enter, an area surrounding petitioner’s residence or any other premises, the order restraining respondent shall specifically describe the area.

(5) Imminent danger under this section includes but is not limited to situations in which the respondent has recently threatened petitioner with additional bodily harm.

(6) If the court awards parenting time to a parent who committed abuse, the court shall make adequate provision for the safety of the child and of the petitioner. The order of the court may include, but is not limited to, the following:

(a) That exchange of a child between parents shall occur at a protected location.

(b) That parenting time be supervised by another person or agency.

(c) That the perpetrator of the abuse be required to attend and complete, to the satisfaction of the court, a program of intervention for perpetrators or any other counseling program designated by the court as a condition of the parenting time.

(d) That the perpetrator of the abuse not possess or consume alcohol or controlled substances during the parenting time and for 24 hours preceding the parenting time.

(e) That the perpetrator of the abuse pay all or a portion of the cost of supervised parenting time, and any program designated by the court as a condition of parenting time.

(f) That no overnight parenting time occur.

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Read Full Text: ORS 107.718

Removal Of Personal Effects


(1) A peace officer who accompanies a party removing essential personal effects pursuant to an order issued under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) shall remain for up to 20 minutes and may temporarily interrupt the removal of property at any time. Nothing in this subsection shall affect a peace officer’s duty to arrest under ORS 133.055 (Criminal citation) and 133.310 (Authority of peace officer to arrest without warrant).

(2) The party removing essential personal effects from the residence pursuant to an order issued under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) is entitled to be accompanied by a peace officer on one occasion only.

(3) A peace officer who accompanies a party removing essential personal effects pursuant to an order issued under ORS 107.718 (Restraining order) shall have immunity from any liability, civil or criminal, for any actions of the party committed during the removal of essential personal effects.


Read Full Text: ORS 107.719

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At Pacific Family Law Firm in Oregon, staying current on the latest developments in Oregon divorce and family law topics is a top priority. Our firm maintains a policy of "information first" for the client, so we make every effort to share information with the public and clients. Our blog covers topics from the frequently asked questions (FAQs) that Oregon family law Lawyers encounter to news headlines that impact Oregon families. If there is a topic you would like to see covered, let us know, and we'll add it to our list of subject matter!

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